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Spine and Posture Pitching Issues
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gauth25

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August 16, 2011 – 12:51 pm
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Sounds good. That will definitely be tough to work with you even though I would love to. I live in Canada just across the border from Detroit. I was working with a guy who was drafted by the A's in 2004 by the name of Steve Carter. He went to Coastal and holds a few records there.

 

Just going over my mechanics it looks like I don't do the inverted W and I do get my arm up in time before I land but I'll wait and see what you think about it.

 

I know I'm definitely not on a good program right now. I was working with a pretty good trainer during the winter but again, not doing the exercises properly just made things worse. I was very strong considering my size. Squatting over 350 for reps and leg pressing 16 plates for reps but once I saw the doctor, he told me I had to stop the lifting and get things in order. So I've been throwing all summer with all my strength gone and am still throwing in the upper 80s with alot of inflammation and irritation.

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Brent Pourciau USAW Certified
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August 16, 2011 – 12:57 pm
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Building that kind of strength takes a long time to go away. I believe that is the reason you are pitching today but the inflammation and irritation sounds like old injury. You may need to take it as far as you can go and then consider scoping the shoulder but this is my opinion and I am not a doctor. I had the same issues before my surgery. I wish I never had the surgery but then I am also glad I had the surgery. It gets to the point that the cuff is so frayed and wore down that the inflammation is almost chronic. I would recommend that you give it your best but if all else fails find a really well respected sports medicine doctor.

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gauth25

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August 16, 2011 – 1:09 pm
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Brent Pourciau USAW Certified said:

Building that kind of strength takes a long time to go away. I believe that is the reason you are pitching today but the inflammation and irritation sounds like old injury. You may need to take it as far as you can go and then consider scoping the shoulder but this is my opinion and I am not a doctor. I had the same issues before my surgery. I wish I never had the surgery but then I am also glad I had the surgery. It gets to the point that the cuff is so frayed and wore down that the inflammation is almost chronic. I would recommend that you give it your best but if all else fails find a really well respected sports medicine doctor.

Ya. When I saw the surgeon after my MRI a few years ago, they found no structural damage just inflammation. He wanted to do a scope of the shoulder and after that was healed, move my ulnar nerve in the elbow because I had constant numbness. It could be a chronic issue but again, my right shoulder was badly weakened and it was pulled forward alot. I only get the inflammation after I throw and I honestly think it's just because the serratus it weak. It does wing a decent amount. It has gotten better since last year. It recovers faster although it is still inflamed. It just doesn't become as inflamed and tender as before which is a good sign. The doctor I saw went over the movements of my shoulder and the rest of my body for a good 2 hours when I first saw him and said he doesn't believe there is any serious issues, just the weakened serratus muscles not being able to function properly.

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gauth25

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August 16, 2011 – 1:12 pm
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Brent Pourciau USAW Certified
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August 16, 2011 – 1:23 pm
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While I work on your analysis read my latest article on Pattern Overload.

https://topvelocity.net/pattern…..-injuries/

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structuredoc

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August 16, 2011 – 1:27 pm
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Tyler,

 

I guarantee you it is not a muscular problem – and what I mean by that is that exercising is not going to correct your problem.  Of course there are muscles involved but it stems from your overall structural integrity.  Didn't you state that your shoulder hunches over?  Most likely you have an anterior deviation (displacement) of a lower thoracic/upper lumbar vertebra.  This is where the latissimus dorsi muscle originates and it inserts into the shoulder.  When the vertebra shifts, the muscle contracts on the other end to compensate and it pulls on the bone to which it is attached.  Basically, it causes your shoulder to become a bit twisted (which can cause inflammation, pain, loss of motion, etc, etc.)  99.9% of the time, the origin of an injury is NOT located at the site of pain/symptom.  And a recurring symptom is almost always a structural problem – unless caused by fracture, infection, growth/tumor, or the like.

 

By the way, if treated properly, your problem should go away in just a couple of treatments.

 

Brent,

 

Some additional data for you: Posture is a major indicator of a structural problem.  Normal posture (when viewed from the side) is as follows: head positioned over the body so that the ear hole is lined up with the shoulder, the hip, the knee, and the ankle.  Also, there should be three distinct curves – forward curve in the neck, backward in the mid-back, and forward again in the lower back.  From the front: the bridge of the nose in line with the notch at the base of the neck, the belly button and a space equally distanced between both ankles.  The key to looking at one's posture, however, is to LET THE BODY SLUMP SO THERE IS LITTLE TO NO MUSCULAR EFFORT.  Anyone can force the body upright (to a greater or lesser degree) for a short while.  Rather, look at how the bones are holding up the body – this is a true test of structural health.  So, in essence, poor posture is an indicator of abnormal structure.

 

Regarding Pettibon, it has its merits but it unfortunately misses the mark with correcting structural in a healthy way.  Their methods attempt to force curvatures back into the body in an attempt to get it more upright.  It cannot be forced – the most consistent, effective, and predictable way to correct abnormal structure is to simply correct the position of bones that have deviated in a direction the body cannot self-correct (anterior) because there is no muscular attachment to do so.  For decades, PTs, chiros, osteos, massage therapists, etc, have attempted to manipulate/adjust the body to make improvements in pain, function, and posture, but with varied and inconsistent results.  This is mainly because they will most often treat the compensations (secondary shifts) which are actually there to help support the body.  These areas are easily identifiable because these are the areas of the symptoms – the tight, tender muscles, the spasms, the pain, etc.  THIS IS ALMOST ALWAYS SECONDARY TO SOMETHING ELSE!  Fix the something else and you fix the secondary things permanently – and it works every time!

 

For more information, you might want to check out the following site… http://www.abcmiracles.com This method of treatment is called Advanced Biostructural Correction (ABC, for short) and it does everything it claims it does – I have been in practice for over 17 years and I am still amazed at how far behind the rest of the healthcare industry is on structural/manual medicine compared to what I do with this type of treatment on a daily basis in my office and out on the playing field with the athletes I work with!

Stu

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gauth25

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August 16, 2011 – 1:34 pm
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I just don't know. It's only my right one that has the problem and again, I never knew until recently how to properly work the muscle. When I actually work the muscle properly, it holds it alot better and the pain is gone.

 

I have very minimal upward rotation in my right shoulder which causes the pinching in my rotator cuff. When I can actually focus and hold it properly, that pain decreases very much.

 

Not saying you're wrong at all but I just don't get how it has gotten better since starting this new rehab process where I've actually been targeting the weakened muscle properly and it has gotten better. I just feel rehabbing it properly for an extended period of time will alot it to rotate properly. I'm still very young.

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gauth25

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August 16, 2011 – 1:36 pm
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The muscle is just not conditioned and strong enough to hold it properly during the length of my start. First inning it holds it well and I feel minimal pain but as I can continue, it becomes fatigued and can no longer hold it properly.

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