Stride Line and Center of Gravity | Talk Pitching | TopVelocity Baseball Forum

A A A
Avatar

Please consider registering
Guest

Search

— Forum Scope —




— Match —





— Forum Options —





Minimum search word length is 3 characters – maximum search word length is 84 characters

Register Lost password?
sp_Feed
Topic Rating: 0 Topic Rating: 0 Topic Rating: 0 Topic Rating: 0 Topic Rating: 0 Topic Rating: 0 (0 votes) 
sp_TopicIcon
Stride Line and Center of Gravity
Avatar
MSTRRYAN2

Rookie
Members
Forum Posts: 48
Member Since:
November 9, 2011
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
1
November 15, 2011 – 10:31 pm
sp_Permalink sp_Print sp_EditHistory
0

Brent, I’ve yet to hear an analysis where you have said “you’re throwing across your body”, do you believe that throwing across your body prohibits 3x and complete opening of the hips?

Barnard in the video here appears to start on the end of the rubber but finishes closer to the middle of the rubber (it’s hard to tell how far across his body he is throwing, but I believe he is). 

Conventional wisdom and old school teachers tell us to draw a line in the dirt from the middle of the rubber towards the plate and to land on or to the left of the line (for RH pitcher).

Your thoughts please

J

Avatar
Brent Pourciau USAW Certified
Mandeville, LA.
Admin
Forum Posts: 2778
Member Since:
April 27, 2008
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
2
November 15, 2011 – 11:03 pm
sp_Permalink sp_Print sp_EditHistory
0

I wrote an article covering your questions here a few weeks back. This will answer your questions.

The Perfect Pitching Placement of Front Foot Strike

Avatar
Coach Robo
Broken Arrow, OK

Minor Leaguer
Members

Coaches
Forum Posts: 257
Member Since:
July 14, 2011
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
3
November 16, 2011 – 12:19 am
sp_Permalink sp_Print
0

This is a very important article (that I missed until it was brought up in this post – boy, it's hard to keep up with everything on this site…).  It is no false claim when Brent writes that “This understanding of stride power converting to core torque through front foot strike was developed here at TopVelocity.net first.”   I am very familiar with the world of pitching instruction and had been teaching pitchers to move “sooner, faster, and farther” for years before I discovered TopVelocity.  But, I know of no one who explained exactly how and why that produced more velocity.  A typical explanation went something like “long, explosive strides cause kinetic energy to shoot up the legs and into the torso and arm”.  Not much science there.  Even NPA, which did the original research on hip and shoulder separation didn't explain what caused it or how to produce it. 

This is what drew me to TopVelocity and 3X.  I believe the explanations here of how velocity is created are the definitive research in the pitching world.  By studying Brent's theories, a pitcher can be analyzed like never before in discovering exactly where his potential for developing more velocity is to be found.  This is a very important web site and Brent is doing some powerful work here. 

And we never stop learning…

Brent – I've been studying hard on the paragraph about Lincecum's foot not landing on a straight line towards the target because in order for his front leg to stabilize and promote optimal hip rotation at front foot strike his front foot must land on his center of gravity.”  Can you go into more detail on that?

What exactly are you calling the center of gravity?  The conventional use of the term refers to the belly button.  And since the pitcher's belly button is never pointed at the target at landing if hip and shoulder separation is achieved, it sounds like you're saying that all pitchers would land off-line to the belly button side of their stride (as are the three pitchers shown in the article). 

What exactly does “the front foot landing on line with his center of gravity” mean?     

Proud father of a U.S. Marine (HOME from Afghanistan)

Avatar
MSTRRYAN2

Rookie
Members
Forum Posts: 48
Member Since:
November 9, 2011
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
4
November 16, 2011 – 12:26 am
sp_Permalink sp_Print
0

“This is because for his front leg to stabilize and promote optimal hip rotation at front foot strike, his front foot must land on his center of gravity.”

 

I'm not understanding this Brent.  Lots of hard throwers land on or left of the line. (I watch lots of Zach Greinke videos because he's a small guy who throws hard).  Is it because “their” center of gravity is different than your examples?  Center of gravity is uncoachable, it just happens doesn't it?  How do you know what is the optimal COG for each pitcher?  What are the factors that influence center of gravity in a pitcher?

 

Is it possible that closing off the hips too much at leg lift prevented the hips from completely opening at landing?  Shouldn't the front hip direct the front leg where to land? 

 

I'm lost on this one Brent.

 

J

Avatar
Zedoryu
Melbourne, Victoria, Australia

Major Leaguer
Members
Forum Posts: 580
Member Since:
August 28, 2011
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
5
November 16, 2011 – 12:37 am
sp_Permalink sp_Print
0

he posted an article way back on in 2008… about the point of of balance.. /pitching-and-the-point-of-balance/

       

Avatar
MSTRRYAN2

Rookie
Members
Forum Posts: 48
Member Since:
November 9, 2011
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
6
November 16, 2011 – 1:02 am
sp_Permalink sp_Print
0

Just thinking out loud here:

 

These guys look like they are on a balance beam.  Their rotational forces must be so fast and tight, like a figure skater.  If I landed like these guys, I would certainly fall off to the left, front leg would collaspe and there would be no ground force transfer.

 

J

Avatar
Coach Robo
Broken Arrow, OK

Minor Leaguer
Members

Coaches
Forum Posts: 257
Member Since:
July 14, 2011
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
7
November 16, 2011 – 1:12 am
sp_Permalink sp_Print
0

Good job, Z.  But, that article leaves me with the same questions Joe and I asked.

What are we calling the center of gravity?  (the second article says it's the hips)

What does it mean to land on the center of gravity?

Do different deliveries create different centers of gravity?

Is there something about Lincecum's and Chapman's stride that creates a center of gravity that requires them to stride right of center to balance their delivery?

Obviously they're pretty good anyway – but what about their stride causes them to plant their lead leg at such an angle – and is that a good thing?

Proud father of a U.S. Marine (HOME from Afghanistan)

Avatar
Zedoryu
Melbourne, Victoria, Australia

Major Leaguer
Members
Forum Posts: 580
Member Since:
August 28, 2011
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
8
November 16, 2011 – 1:25 am
sp_Permalink sp_Print
0

I guess it's to keep themselves balanced. Like when I do a full stride with my toes on the same line to the target I am abit wobbly(obviously a strength issue), and when I put my foot slightly off my body I gain more balance and I can stay in that position for longer.

       

Forum Timezone: America/Chicago

Most Users Ever Online: 86

Currently Online:
14 Guest(s)

Currently Browsing this Page:
1 Guest(s)

Top Posters:

Zedoryu: 580

norcalRHP: 317

SCOTT D: 288

Coach Robo: 257

singtall: 168

Brandon: 129

Newest Members:

vuhbipj

vuhbij

ygvihubij

carrollwise

suehardy

jonahcf.12

Forum Stats:

Groups: 5

Forums: 34

Topics: 1746

Posts: 8111

 

Member Stats:

Guest Posters: 6

Members: 1971

Moderators: 0

Admins: 3

Administrators: 3x coach Kevin, 3x coach CJ, Brent Pourciau USAW Certified

Menu