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Teaching Front Foot Strike
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propitchinginstitute

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August 30, 2011 – 9:50 pm
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Brent,

Pitching Chain Management allows me to teach any age Pitcher to get recognized through a combination of velocity and command.

– Before I continue, when I use torque, I refer to a twisting or turning force. 
– The forward momentum generated by a Foot Plant is a directional force. 

I have yet to understand how a directional force impacts torque.  Perhaps you can enlighten me how the human body incorporates directional force into a Pitcher's twisting and turning force?  I've always been taught that a body in motion stays in motion until met with a force.  To me, a Pitcher's Foot Plant stops the directional force and then the Pitcher begins or continue with (depending upon their degree of “separation”) their throwing action.

In my mind (until you explain to me how forward force translate into torque), the 2 ways you present to produce force at foot strike not only compromise command, but, because they compromise command, limit pitching careers.  Besides, they are not the only ways to generate torque in a motion.

Presuming a Pitcher comes into their Foot Plant vertically stacked (Pitching Chain Management makes this a teachable skill) and their Front Foot has yet to make contact with the ground, the Pitcher creates torque by moving their Glove Arm across their Body.  Everything from that point becomes a reflex reaction …

Their Front Foot lands on their target line, their Back Hip opens (comes toward your target) to increase your Upper Body rotation and their Throwing Hand comes through a consistently tiny release window.

The Back Hip opening may interest readers …

Just like a spinning Skater, the closer your Limbs to your Body, the more force your rotation possesses. The Back Hip coming forward makes your Body smaller and adds to your Body's rotation which increase your Throwing Arm speed.

I do not actively teach a Stride (forward momentum) because a Stride directly contradictions certain physical and physiological factors I'm sure you learned during your USAW Certification.

Your Stride and Velocity –

Your Active Stride compromises your velocity in 2 ways …

1.  Your Stride can slightly improve your velocity by increasing the forward speed in your Throwing Hand, but, at Foot Plant, the forward momentum fails to move into your rotational actions.

2.  Your Back Hips fails to fire toward your target.  Without bringing your Back Hip into your Body, your fail to increase the force in your Upper Body which translates to no increase in Throwing Arm speed.

Your Stride and Command –

Your Stride impacts your command in one of 2 ways …

1.  Your active Stride brings your weight so far forward so quickly that your Front Foot makes contact with the ground before you activate your Glove Arm.  Your Glove Arm works much more independently and increase your release window.

2.  Your overactive Front Leg causes your Head to tilt back toward Second Base.  Your tilt remains until, just prior to your Foot Plant, your Glove Hand actively comes across your Body to bring your Trunk back to vertical.  You lose your rotational force and force your Throwing Arm to work independently.  In the process, you expand your release window.

I look forward to hearing your explanation.

L.A. “Skip” Fast
Pro Pitching Institute

L.A. “Skip” Fast
Pro Pitching Institute

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singtall

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August 30, 2011 – 10:59 pm
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sounds like you are trying to sell your own program on this site.

i'm not a professional like Brent is, but my son has learned from Brent's books.  let me tell you what i know: my son has both speed and command using Brent's methods.  i myself am 44yrs old and i can now pitch and have good command using the same methods.  Brent's method is easy to teach, the catch is that you have to be strong enough in certain areas to throw that way.

this is not the same as what Dick Mills is trying to teach.  so don't confuse science with science fiction.

just look at Lincecum and Chapman and you will see forward movement converted into power.  i myself can attest to feeling the power come up from my legs, through my hips, my chest and finally my arm using Brent's method.  

you really need to buy the book if you want to debunk it.  Brent owns everybody else's books and can tell you about anybody methods,  if you consider yourself a professional, then you should invest in the program.  at least then you will have an idea of what you are talking about.  buy the book, do the workout, see and feel the power and command.  are you afraid it will upset your current teaching and make a believer out of you?  you can only benefit from this teaching.

in less than scientific terms; think of this way of pitching like a car driving forward at 60mph then hitting a wall and the driver goes flying out of the windshield.  the legs are the car, and the ball as the driver.  if everything is moving forward, then all you have to do is release the ball to the batter.  rotation in itself isn't accurate, forward momentum is.

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Brent Pourciau USAW Certified
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August 31, 2011 – 12:36 am
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Ross, he is only debating our approaches with me. I appreciate your support.

Skip, you have a very good understanding of front foot strike. I believe you have this understanding because you have studied it enough to know exactly how it works with hard, precise professional pitchers. I just feel that your approach has a missing link which you pointed out here:

I have yet to understand how a directional force impacts torque.  Perhaps you can enlighten me how the human body incorporates directional force into a Pitcher’s twisting and turning force?

This tells me that you know it is a factor, you just haven’t spent the time to discover the answer. I have spent my entire career searching for this answer and I discovered it at the very end of my career, after rotator cuff surgery.

Here is the answer to how directional force from the pitchers stride creates hip rotation. It works, just like I pointed out before, similiar to a combustable engine. Here is an animation of a directional force (piston rod) moving a rotational force (gear) in the engine.

 

 

In the engine, the combustion of the fuel is driving the piston and piston rod in a direction towards the drive shaft or gear in this animation. Because the rod is connected to an outer edge of the gear, the directional force rotates the gear. The legs connect to the hips in a similar fashion. The legs work like the piston rod here in the animation. The drive leg pushes the right hip forward for a right handed pitcher and the landing leg at front foot strike pushes the left hip back. This like the piston rod rotates the hips. This is also why I discovered that triple extension, which is the extension of the drive leg ankle, knee and hip flexor must occur just before or just at front foot strike to convert the power of the drive into the rotation of the hips. This triple extension will open the hips before front foot strike which when the front foot lands and stabilizes, causes the right hip to almost slam into the front knee creating optimal hip to shoulder separation which you see here with Brandon Morow.

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propitchinginstitute

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August 31, 2011 – 6:53 am
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Brent,

Nature's physical forces don't just go away just because you're pitching. To maximum force, you want your rotational force to be on the same plane as your directional force. 

I understand and agree with your approach, but, to my Eyes, the gears go in the same direction as the piston???  The last I checked, a Pitcher's Shoulders (their gears) work on a horizontal plane than their Stride (the piston) work on a linear plane. 

Thus, in my opinion, a Pitcher is better served by making their Glove Arm action the piston that powers their Shoulder's to drive their Throwing Hand.

What am I missing?

L.A. “Skip” Fast
Pro Pitching Institute

L.A. “Skip” Fast
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Brent Pourciau USAW Certified
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August 31, 2011 – 11:49 am
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You could put the animation of the piston and gear in the same layout as the pitcher. You could flip the gear to the horizontal plane and the piston rod to the linear plane. The piston rod can also hang down to the ground like the pitchers leg. When the piston rod drives forward on the linear plane it will still rotate the gear on the horizontal plane. To make it even more like the pitcher you would add another piston rod as the front leg pushing on the opposite side of the gear to assist in the rotation at front foot strike.

The problem with using your glove side to generate rotation is that it will rotate your shoulders before your hips and you know that we need the hips before the shoulders. Once we separate the hips from shoulders through triple extension then the shoulders rotate as a reaction to that torque. The glove side then becomes a fulcrum for this rotation. The more stable the fulcrum, the more efficient the rotation. I like to coach building power and converting that power from the ground up, using the ground reaction forces of the drive and landing legs.

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glenn

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September 1, 2011 – 11:00 am
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Hi Brent,

Do you have Brandon Morrow's complete delivery with the camera angle from ABOVE? I'm trying to see how far his front hip travels before he starts his 3X, then to see how far forward his back hip rotates just before or at footstrike. I think it's a great tool to use to see the timing of both the linear and rotational components of pitching. Do you have any other videos of other pitchers that you can post?

 

Thanks,

Glenn

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Brent Pourciau USAW Certified
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September 1, 2011 – 11:34 am
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Here is a link to download the video. Make sure you right click and save file on the link.

https://topvelocity.net/videos/…..opview.mov

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Zedoryu
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September 3, 2011 – 8:52 pm
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as Brent said that you can flip the gear to the horizontal plane or linear plane. I don’t know which is which. But, you do this effectively when you tilt backwards. When you tilt backwards it is pretty much a sidearm action, but since you have turned the body instead of the arm it becomes an overhand delivery. What I am saying is because when you pitch sidearm the plane does not change. So if you tilt backwards it becomes easier to generate torque so that you are not forcing the gear to flip or just using the arm to flip the gear. Which is why I think the tilt is important for the pitching delivery as well.

       

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