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Character Crafting
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Zedoryu
Melbourne, Victoria, Australia

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November 28, 2012 – 5:08 pm
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I have found something really cool on the mental game and it gives you the chance to re-live your childhood days (I guess) and it would be really awesome if Brent could focus some part of his mental program on this :) .

What do M&Ms have to do with your success? You’ll find out later. So firstly, I’m going to share with you four pillars to performing your best.

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Talent: Talent is actually your genetic makeup, your physical stature, intellectual capacity – not your IQ, but your brain’s capacity to learn. So your genetics: It’s like your height, your eye colour – that’s what talent really actually is. So I hope you stop using talent as an excuse for why someone might be better than you.

Skills/Information: This is the knowledge you’ve acquired, it’s what you have learnt. What do you know about the strategies? What sort of coaching you’ve received, the quality of the coach is also obviously going to impact your skills, because they’ve given you good information. The environment – people you hang out with, your teammates, and your coach. These all affect what information you acquire.

Motivation: The desire to apply the first two. We have a natural born motivation; it’s our urge to achieve, to learn, to grow and to excel. It’s not a learned skill, we are born with it. Babies come out with the urge to learn and grow. Watch them, they’re constantly learning from their environment and they want to apply the talent that they are born with. We have a natural born desire to want to apply them. Don’t make a mistake. A natural urge to achieve is an internal motivator; it’s not an external motivator. External motivators are things like rewards or someone else pushing you forward. Now that can help to release some internal motivation, but don’t forget you have a natural desire to want to function at your highest potential. That’s why when you’re not getting the performances that you really want, you start to go internal, and you start judging yourself, and so you need these external motivators to get these things back out. So just remember that you have a natural born desire to want to achieve, to learn and to grow. These three pillars make up your potential.

Emotion: This is the braking system on all of our potential. Potential has to flow through this to reach our performance. This is the key to your performance. Your behaviour or actions are a result of how you feel.

Now it’s not to say that the first three pillars aren’t important, but your ability to use that potential is directly related to the fourth pillar. It’s not because you don’t have the potential, you’ve already proved that you do have the potential, but you’re limiting your potential because you have pulled the braking system. You can’t drive a high-performance car with the emergency brakes on and get mad at the people who make the car when it doesn’t reach top speed. You can’t even blame the car. It’s not the car’s fault. The same thing goes for you. Don’t judge or beat yourself up because your performances have been weak at times. It’s not your fault. You just weren’t taught how this system works. You just simply have to release the brakes. So what’s the most effective way to release the brakes? The answer actually lies in the movie industry. Let me explain. When you go and see an actor in a movie, who are you actually seeing on the screen? Are you seeing them, or are you seeing a character they’re portraying that has over exaggerated qualities, or that’s been scripted for them? When something bad happens to the character, does the actor, the actual person get upset by it? Of course not, because they’re acting out the character, it was written in the script. So in the context of their performance, they get to completely jump over this barrier of the emotional braking system. Because they are playing a character and he gets to be somebody else, all of his worries, insecurities, judgements they have about themselves, well of course that doesn’t come into play when they’re playing a character, so all this potential gets to completely jump over and then what happens is they have a great performance. Not to say all actors always have great performances, because we obviously know that that’s not true, but that has more to do with what happened with the skills, the coaching, the information that they’ve received over the course of their careers.  So in the context of his performance, he gets to completely jump over this barrier of the emotional braking system because he’s free to play a character on screen. There are so many similarities with what actors do and what athletes do. It’s crazy. They have a stage to play on, and so do we. We have to perform, they have to perform. Movies are an emotional experience with ups and downs and sports can be emotional rollercoasters with ups and downs and there’s changes and flows to games. We practice our skills daily, they practice their skills daily. Are you starting to see the connection here? You see, the problem amateur athletes have is that they take themselves into the game instead of a character or alter ego. That is the secret professional athletes have been carrying. They are completely different people on the court than they are off the court. In fact their personalities aren’t even close to the same. Well you may say that you kind of do that already you play super intense or super aggressive, etc. Sorry, but that’s not the same because it doesn’t ultimately fool your brain or your identity. What do M&M’s have to do with your success? You see, back in the 1940s when America was out in war, they had problems getting rations to the troops that were of the treat variety. Chocolate would always melt and it wasn’t the best to carry around in your pockets obviously. So they never gave them chocolate. Well, Forrest Mars, the inventor of the M&M’s had found an ingenious way of delivering that nice little chocolate and treat the troops by simply wrapping it with candy that didn’t melt around the chocolate. Now they can enjoy the chocolate that they all loved. Well, that’s what building a new performance character or alter ego is like for you. Potential is like the chocolate, it’s what you want. Unfortunately it comes under the influence of that emotional braking system and it melts, and you don’t get to reap the rewards of all that hard work, skill, talent and motivation you already have. But when you develop that character, it’s like adding a coating to your personal ego. Now all of your potential can show up because it’s not you that’s performing, it’s a character you’re giving your job to do for you. You create the character, the alter ego to go and step in to that stage to go do the job for you. All that potential gets to come out and get played through the character. We all carry around little insecurities, little judgements, little worries that we have about others and ourselves, but we don’t want to take all that stuff out onto the field, I don’t want to be worrying about impressing people when I’m in a game time situation because that’s not going to suit my performance very well. You know, athletes themselves don’t play the game; they had a character they would step in to when they got on the field. You would be too nice to be great at your sport, so you would have to become something different on the field. So I’d like people to start thinking about who they would like to become? This can be a fun process and completely liberating, it can completely liberate your potential.

Choosing baseball athletes is fine, but I would like you to really expand your mind and pick other characters like for me I would pick Iron Man aka Robert Downey Jr. (he’s just the beast! even in Sherlock Holmes) or Batman. They are both superheroes without any magical powers. They both just have this badass attitude that fits my sort of mental mindset, compared to a guy like Jason in Friday the 13th, and I guess that is what makes them so “super” even though they have no “super”. They are all good choices, and I want you to pick some of your own and try and craft the character for you!

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McHugh75
Cincinnati, OH

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November 28, 2012 – 6:51 pm
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Z,

That post must have taken you an hour to write! Upon seeing this post, I said, “Wow, this is gonna take a while to read. Better go grab some snacks.”

With that said, I don’t know if having an alter ego is the best of options for a few reasons:

-It could carry over into your actual persona

-You may come off as cocky or just insane (see “T-Plush”)

-It’s probably not healthy to have multiple personalities

Now I have no actual experience with this so I may be totally wrong but I just thought I should share my thoughts.

“What I gave I have, what I didn’t give I’ve lost forever.” ~ Dan Devine

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Zedoryu
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November 28, 2012 – 9:06 pm
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The thing is you are not in your alter ego the whole time. So most of the time you would be in your normal persona. You would be choosing your own character, so unless if you want to come off as cocky or insane, you would choose characters with cocky or insane characters. It may not be healthy to have multiple personalities, but in a sense you are tailoring a character to your needs and developing their mindset rather than another personality.

       

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Darrell Coulter
Bonne Terre, Mo

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December 10, 2012 – 10:00 pm
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Guys,

I hear ya.

The Pitcher’s Mindset, I believe is what separates Average pitchers from the Great pitchers.

But the real key is focusing on what a Pitcher can believe.

Being able to handle the pressure that comes with success takes a Faith that focuses on the things you can control.

The problem most pitchers have is that they don’t know what they really need to know to be great, so they just fake it until they fail and quit.

There is so much ego and B.S out in the “Pitching World” that people don’t know who or what to believe. 

So finding instruction and coaching comes down to three key areas.

  1. What You know and can improve on.
  2. What you know you don’t know and find good instruction or coaching to help.
  3. What you don’t know you don’t know.  That takes an open mind to realize that you might not know everything and that a learning, evolving and growing mindset is what it really takes to be the best Pitcher in the world.

Those 3 keys are the “Insider secrets of every great Major League Pitcher”

That is How you become a Million Dollar Pitcher.

That’s what Brent and I spend everyday trying to get young pitchers and coaches to understand…

when they do, it changes them for ever.

Unfortunately Few are willing to pay the price,

but the few that do get to experience things that most can only dream about.

That’s what I love about pitching.  How about YOU?

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