Lift for Show, Load for Doe!

Lift for Show, Load for Doe!Ok, the leg lift isn’t only for “Show.” There is a lot of momentum that can be generated by the leg lift which transfers into velocity. The question is, “How come pitchers who have big leg lift’s in the wind up, when pitching in the stretch, have a lower leg lift but still throw the same velocity?” The answer is called the “Load.”

“Loading” is when the pitcher holds his weight back over his back leg, while his front side continues building momentum towards the target. This is why strong legs and core, produce powerful pitching. Look at Eric Gagne in this picture. He is squatting on his back leg, waiting for the perfect time to fire his hips and then his shoulders.

A component of velocity is produced when torque is generated in the two rotational pivots. The rotation of the hips to the rotation of the shoulders. Tim Lincecum calls this the “Rubber Band.” Think of your core as a “Rubber Band.” Rotating the shoulder and hip pivot separate from each other would tighten the “Rubber Band.” This sounds a lot easier than it actually is to perform. This is why a small amount of athletes can throw a baseball over 90 mph.

Lift for Show, Load for Doe!The importance of the “Load” is that it holds the weight back until the first pivot, the hips, are ready to build maximum torque. Triple extension in the back leg occurs after the “Load” and accelerates momentum into front foot strike, forcing the hips to pivot. If “Separation” occurs between the hips to shoulders then maximum torque is created. Notice the pitcher here in this position. His hip rotation is now complete. He has built maximum torque between his hips and shoulders, you can see this in the tightening of his “Rubber Band,” notice his shirt is stretching like a rubber band would. Now, all that is left to do, is to fire the shoulders forward and then stabilize. Stabilization of the front leg allows the momentum generated from the body to transfer into torque and then into the velocity of the ball.

If the pitcher didn’t “Load” his weight back, as his front side continued to build momentum, optimal hip to shoulder separation would become impossible for the pitcher. His hips and shoulders would move in sync with one another and his chances of reaching his top velocity would be reduced significantly. He would also put more stress on his arm to generate most of his velocity.

In conclusion, a good “Load” position is more valuable for a pitcher than a high lift leg. It generates as much or more momentum but is critical in generating optimal hip to shoulder separation.

, , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,
Previous Post
Bringing Violence into the Pitching Delivery of Baseball
Next Post
Bigger, Stronger, Faster in Baseball Training

25 Comments. Leave new

[…] to your slide which will build more momentum and increase your stride power. Read my article “Lift for Show, Load for Doe” to learn more about the […]

Reply

Ron, you need to continue with your education. Read 3X Pitching and ask questions until you truly understand it. You are old enough to start learning the lifts in the Fusion System. You can hold off on the weight until you get the mechanics of the lifts down. You are at a perfect age to start working at this. Just make sure you give it time and do not rush your results.

Reply

Brent I am 14 years old and throwing in the 70s what do you think i would need to do to throw in the 80s because i don't know if i should fix my mechanics or do the workouts in the fusion system.

Reply

After Triple Extension you should NOT quickly throw the ball. You should allow your hips to completely open and your shoulders to remain closed so you can create optimal core torque. This will create a little delay after your front foot lands. Then you will continue to accelerate up the kinetic chain. You really need to purchase 3X Pitching to understand all of this.

https://topvelocity.net/3xpitching

Reply

So would you say that i should start accelerate the most during triple extension until i can't triple extend anymore and then quickly throw the ball.

Reply

It is more important that your speed is accelerating than if you are just moving fast. This means timing is as important as speed. You can move fast just make sure you are not decelerating at any point in your delivery.

Reply

hey Brent its Ron i have a question, does moving fast through your pitching delivery give you more velocity in the end or does it matter. If so how can i move faster through my delivery.

Reply
brooks carson
January 5, 2011 5:58 am

eyyyy brent how areyou , i have a question when you bring your arm out of your glove and bring it down and around, do u want to accelerate through that entire process or do you wanna take that slow and then accelerate into release. thanks coach and are any new articles coming ?

Reply

    Yes, keep your ARM relaxed as possible and do not swing or lead with your ARM. You want your ARM to accelerate after external rotation. Thanks for pushing me Brooks. I will try to get some new stuff soon.

    Reply

Thanks Brooks! Happy New Year!

Reply
Brooks carson
January 1, 2011 11:08 pm

Happy new year Brent you helped me a lot

Reply

I agree with a lot of what you are saying but i think that you are not going into the bio mechanical aspect enough there is more to mechanics than what i am seeing maybe i missed a few things. Im seeing a lot about Scap loading and core and lower body which is only half of the mechanics that young pitchers need to learn especially when they are getting in to there pre-teen years and the high school careers not only do they need to learn the scap load but they need to know about how the chest and shoulders and the importance that they have on the torque to better protect there rotator-cuff's and there clavicular structure which can lead to tearing of the rotator-cuff and the tearing of the intraspinatus which is the main muscle in the rotator-cuff they need to be taught how to isolate the Latississimus muscles to re-leave unnecessary stress and strain on the rotator-cuff by teaching a move powerfull pronation they can achieve this and strengthen there understanding of there mechanics.

P.S. if you would like to talk to me you have my email and can contact me further through it

Reply

Hey Coach, I just wanted to put my info out there so you can send me the information for the tests and quizzes.

Reply

Hey Coach, it is Ryan Martin from the 8th Grade Baseball Team. I just wanted to put info out there so you can send the information for the tests and quizzes. Thanks

Reply
Collin D'Angelo
February 9, 2009 9:33 am

Hey coach, it's Collin D'Angelo and I was just checking out your website and putting my e-mail address out there so you can send me stuff and quiz me. This website is really cool and I tried to send you a comment 2 days ago but it told me I had an error. So I am sorry for this being so late.

Thanks,

Collin

Reply

Hey Coach, its T.J. Jenkins i was just letting you know that I checked out the website and looked at some of the videos.

Reply

hey coach its Tyler Schott just checking in so you can send me stuff

Reply

hey coach, its Thomas Harrison just letting know i have checked out your website so you can send us some information.

Reply
Christian Breath
February 7, 2009 9:10 pm

Hey Coach, its Christian Breath from St. Paul's 8th grade and I was checking out this website.

Reply
Christian Berry
February 7, 2009 11:48 am

Hey coach it's Christian Berry i was just checking in like you told us to.

Reply

Hey Coach Brent, I was just letting you know that i have checked out your website, and like the things you talk about.

Thanks,

Rick Ragan

Reply

Hey coach, I was just checking in so you could send the stuff you wanted to like you told us at St. Pauls 8th grade tryouts today.

Reply
Austin Tinney
February 5, 2009 4:39 pm

Hey coach, its Austin Tinney.

I was wonderin if you could send me some things on pitchin.

Thanks,,

Reply

Hey coach, it's Joel Spansel I was just checking out your website and just wanted to let you know.

Reply

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Fill out this field
Fill out this field
Please enter a valid email address.

 

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Menu